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"Unveiling the Power of Ancestral Inner Beauty: Embracing Your True Self"

Updated: Feb 20




“Ancestral Inner Beauty" refers to the beauty that is passed down through generations of a family. It also encompasses the inner beauty that exists within every individual, which may be influenced by their ancestry and cultural heritage. Some people believe that connecting with their ancestral roots can help them tap into their inner beauty and feel more grounded and centered. However, the concept of "inner beauty” is subjective and can mean different things to different people. Ultimately, true beauty comes from within and is reflected in one's actions, thoughts, and character. As a cosmetologist, my job is to stay informed and use beauty products and cosmetics through various means, such as tools, services, or information. I have recently delved into holistic care and culture, both in my personal life and at the salon.


I have mentored many young women in my life and noticed that many of them lack knowledge about self-care. This could be due to the absence of a female figure in their lives, being raised by men, or the need for more information to be available. From my personal experience as a person of color, we are not privileged to have access to the same luxuries as others. We are busy trying to make a living, raise a family, and take care of our basic needs. We share traditions and ways in which we can care for ourselves, but nothing more. BIPOC women also do not trust the healthcare system due to our historical distrust of treatment (Williams and Rucker, 75-90). We have created ways of caring for ourselves within our communities, some of which we still follow and some we have abandoned due to social media aesthetics and shame.


I aim to explore our ancestors' beauty standards and analyze them from a cosmetology perspective. I want to determine which practices we should continue, adopt or modernize. These practices can include tribal beauty looks, self-care, health concerns such as self-healing from trauma and maintaining a healthy diet and sleep routine. Maslow's hierarchy of needs discusses what we require to maintain homeostasis (Cherry). There are particular fundamental necessities that we need to sustain our physical body. However, as women, we may have additional needs that require a deeper understanding of ourselves, our capabilities, and our available resources.


As a cosmetologist, I am proud to delve into the unique beauty cultures of my diverse clientele, including those with black, Latino, Asian, indigenous American, Caribbean Islander, and diasporic backgrounds. I express gratitude with mindfulness, allowing myself to know that my beauty was created before me. I have the power to inhabit this beauty, and I can make my way of taking care of myself with all the information available. As an African American woman, the late 50s to the 70s helped pave the way for American beauty culture in terms of my self-expression and acceptance. Many looks were rebellious and sophisticated during that time, with a profound meaning (NMAAHC). This is a concept I have adopted in my salon culture: making your look your own and letting me mean something to your soul. It's deeper than the outer appearance, and it's something profound in your soul. Let’s explore further. Can you tell me about a traditional beauty ritual from your culture that you have either maintained, abandoned, or questioned?




Works Cited


Cherry, Kendra. “Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs.” Verywellmind, 14 Aug. 2022, www.verywellmind.com/what-is-maslows-hierarchy-of-needs-4136760. Accessed 4 Feb. 2024.

Maslow’s hierarchy of needs discusses the things we require to maintain homeostasis.


National Museum of African American History and Culture . “Black Is Beautiful: The Emergence of Black Culture and Identity in the 60s and 70s | National Museum of African American History and Culture.” Nmaahc.si.edu, 8 July 2019, nmaahc.si.edu/explore/stories/black-beautiful-emergence-black-culture-and-identity-60s-and-70s.

As an African American woman, the late 50s to the 70s helped pave the way for American beauty culture in terms of self-expression and acceptance. Many looks were rebellious and sophisticated during that time, with a profound meaning.


Williams, David R., and Toni D. Rucker. “Understanding and Addressing Racial Disparities in Health Care.” Health Care Financing Review, vol. 21, no. 4, 2020, pp. 75–90, www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4194634/. Accessed 4 Feb. 2024.

BIPOC women also do not trust the healthcare system due to our historic distrust of treatment.

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